May 1

Kory Wilson

Kory Wilson - Executive Director, Indigenous Initiatives and Partnerships, British Columbia Institute of Technology

Kory Wilson, BSc. JD, is the Executive Director of Indigenous Initiatives and Partnerships for British Columbia Institute of Technology. She is Kwakwaka’wakw. Kory is Chair of the National Indigenous Education Committee of Colleges and Institutions Canada and she has over 20 years of experience in post-secondary education, community development, and the legal profession. She has a deep commitment to education and has dedicated her working life to ensuring that under-represented learners succeed, both within learning institutions and the larger community. Good governance and supporting communities to move towards self-government is a passion. Innovative and creative solutions are needed to move Reconciliation into ReconciliACTION. Education is the key and access to knowledge is vital to move everyone forward.


Larry Chartrand (University of Saskatchewan)

Professor Chartrand is the Academic Director of the Native Law Centre at the University of Saskatchewan, on leave from the University of Ottawa. Prof. Chartrand’s research interests include Indigenous and Constitutional law, including the Indigenization of the legal profession and academy.


Laurie Meijer Drees (Vancouver Island University)

Dr. Laurie Meijer Drees is Chair of the First Nations Studies department at Vancouver Island University. She has held faculty positions at the University of Saskatchewan, First Nations University of Canada, and the University of Alaska-Fairbanks. A former Fulbright Scholar, she is passionate about understanding and facilitating Indigenous pedagogies, and the role of orality in Indigenous Studies.


Stephen Cheng (University of Regina) and Vincent Ziffle (First Nations University)

Dr. Stephen Cheng teaches chemistry at the University of Regina. He has a strong interest in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning and was the Faculty Associate at the Centre for Teaching and Learning for three years. As a chemist, he enjoys cooking in his spare time.

Dr. Vincent Ziffle is an Assistant Professor at First Nations University of Canada. He is part of the Indigenous Science program and has a strong interest in uses of medicinal plants of the Saskatchewan prairie and their molecular makeup. He is also a synthetic organic chemist with an interest in food science.


Diane (DeDe) Dawson (University of Saskatchewan)

Diane (DeDe) Dawson is a Science and Scholarly Communication Librarian at the University Library, University of Saskatchewan. In addition to her MLIS degree, she holds a BSc in Biology and an MSc in Earth Sciences. Driven by her education and research background in the sciences, she has a strong interest in the ways scientists communicate the results of their research and how libraries can support this. DeDe’s research focuses on scholarly communication and open access issues, and her professional practice includes information literacy instruction to undergraduate and graduate students.


Anna-Leah King (University of Regina)

Dr. Anna-Leah King currently works in the Faculty of Education, University of Regina in Education Core Studies and Indigenization. Her teaching includes anti-oppressive education. She is Vice-Chair of the Indigenous Advisory Circle for the University as well as Chair of Indigenization for the Faculty of Education.


Sandy Bonny (University of Saskatchewan)

Sandy Bonny (PhD 2007) coordinates STEM Access initiatives for the Aboriginal Student Achievement Program, College of Arts & Science. With an interdisciplinary background in the natural sciences and literary arts, she is inspired by intersections of story, and the role of narrative in teaching and learning across disciplinary, cultural, and generational perspectives.


Ashleigh Androsoff  (University of Saskatchewan)

Dr. Ashleigh Androsoff joined the University of Saskatchewan as an Assistant Professor of Western Canadian History in July 2016, having taught at the post-secondary level for five years. Originally from B.C., she is proud of her Doukhobor and Métis roots.


Emily Grafton and Alec Couros (University of Regina)

Emily Grafton is the Executive Lead, Indigenization at the University of Regina. She is a member of the Metis nation and has a PhD in Native Studies (University of Manitoba). Emily has worked as a researcher and consultant for Indigenous, provincial, and civic governments, non-government agencies, and academic institutions.

Alec Couros is a Professor of educational technology and media at the Faculty of Education, University of Regina. He has given hundreds of workshops and presentations, nationally and internationally, on topics such as openness in education, networked learning, social media in education, digital citizenship, and critical media literacy.


Karla Panchuk and Joyce McBeth (University of Saskatchewan)

Karla Panchuk is a sessional lecturer in Geological Sciences at the University of Saskatchewan and St. Peter’s College. She is currently working on the adaptation of an open textbook for physical geology.

Joyce McBeth is an Assistant Professor in University of Saskatchewan Geological Sciences. She began her journey down the rabbit hole of unusual Creative Commons licensing issues through her involvement in Karla’s open textbook project.


Stryker Calvez (University of Saskatchewan)

Dr. Stryker Calvez is a Metis/Michif researcher and educator from the Red River territory around Winnipeg. Over the last 20 years he has worked extensively with provincial governments, post-secondary institutions, organizations and communities to better understand how to implement and/or improve educational, social support, and health programming for Indigenous peoples, newcomers to Canada, and vulnerable populations. He has been recognized for his contributions to these communities, building better understandings of Indigenous people, supporting diversity and inclusion management, and facilitating effective intergroup relations. Currently he is the Manager of Indigenous Education Initiatives at the University of Saskatchewan. In this position, Stryker has been leading and supporting numerous institutional indigenization priorities, building reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, developing cultural professional development initiatives, and consulting with colleges and schools to develop and implement indigenization strategies.


Simon Lambert (University of Saskatchewan)

Dr. Simon Lambert is a recently appointed Associate Professor in Indigenous Studies at the University of Saskatchewan. His research areas are Indigenous environmental management with particular interest in disaster risk reduction.


Heather Nelson and Twana White (Saskatchewan Polytechnic)

Heather Nelson RN, BScN, MA Leadership (in progress). She is involved in several research projects on Indigenous nursing student success strategies, TOWES and the international student experience in Canada.

Twana White RN, BSN, MAEd is a faculty member in the Practical Nursing Program at Saskatchewan Polytechnic. Twana is a clinical coordinator and instructor. She is engaged in Indigenous Student research and TOWES.


Shirley Swelchalot Shxwha:yathel Hardman, Peter Geller, and Carol Dickson (University of Fraser Valley)

Shirley Swelchalot Shxwha:yathel Hardman, Sr. Advisor/Indigenous Affairs, UFV. She lives and works in her ancestral territory. She studied at University of Alberta, SFU and UBC. Her life’s work is promoting education and reconciliation.

Peter Geller has been the Vice Provost & Associate Vice President Academic at UFV since 2012. He provides support & leadership for: UFV International, academic operations in Chandigarh, academic advising, quality assurance, and Indigenization.

Carol Dickson has been the Executive Assistant, Vice-Provost’s Office at UFV since 2012. In her work she constantly navigates.  This requires a genuine appreciation and understanding of protocol, cultural competencies, discretion, confidentiality, and professionalism. Carol’s graduate studies are  in Educational Leadership.


Hugh McGuire (Rebus Foundation)

Hugh McGuire has been building technologies and communities to support open publishing and open culture for almost 15 years. He is the founder of LibriVox (free public domain audiobooks), Pressbooks (open source book publishing software) and Rebus Community (a platform and community to support open textbook publishing). He lives and works in Montreal.


Brenda Macdougall (University of Ottawa) and Maria Campbell (University of Saskatchewan)

Maria is a writer, artist, and cultural knowledge keeper, currently working as a cultural advisor in the College of Law and at the Gwenna Moss Centre for Teaching & Learning at the University of Saskatchewan. Brenda was appointed the Chair of Métis Research at the University of Ottawa in 2010 after working for over ten years in Native Studies at the University of Saskatchewan. They have worked together for over 20 years researching, teaching, and writing. Both have strong relationships with Indigenous communities and are currently exploring how to create land-based courses that would bring students from a variety of universities to Maria’s property, The Crossing, to learn about traditional forms of leadership and governance. Both are committed to finding spaces on campus where Indigenous students can intellectually thrive.


Leah Ferguson, Cindy Deschenes, and Susan Bens (University of Saskatchewan)

Dr. Leah Ferguson, Métis, is an Assistant Professor in the College of Kinesiology where she teaches Indigenous wellness and research methods undergraduate courses. Her research areas are sport, health, and exercise psychology, and Indigenous health.

Cindy Deschenes is a Health Sciences PhD student. Cindy’s research will study the effects of the 7 Habits of Highly Effective People through The Leader in Me and Lead processes. Cindy originates from Kitiganik and Kitigan Zibi communities in QC.

Dr. Susan Bens is an Educational Development Specialist working at the Gwenna Moss Centre for Teaching and Learning. In support of Indigenization efforts, she is developing her competence and confidence as an ally in this important work.


Jay Wilson (University of Saskatchewan)

Dr. Jay Wilson is an Associate Professor and Head of the Department of Curriculum Studies at the University of Saskatchewan. His program of research centers on innovation in teacher education, experiential learning, and design studio learning environments. Dr. Wilson works to support the understanding and growth of pre-service and in-service teachers through his service and scholarship. He has extensive practical experience in the area of technology and its application to teaching and instruction. He is also skilled in the areas of multimedia production, program evaluation, and innovative design in learning environments. Jay’s teaching has been recognized in many ways including the 2017 3M National Teaching Fellowship.


Heather M. Ross (University of Saskatchewan)

Heather M. Ross is an educational developer in the Gwenna Moss Centre for Teaching and Learning at the University of Saskatchewan, where she leads the university’s open educational resources (OER) initiative, advises on course development, and co-leads the institution’s digital information literacy initiative. She is also an OER Research Fellow with the Open Education Group. Her research interests include student and instructor views of adopting, modifying, and using OER, and the effect the use of OER has on student learning outcomes in higher education.


Patricia McDougall

Patricia McDougall - vice-provost teaching, learning and student experience

Patricia McDougall serves as the Vice Provost Teaching and Learning at the University of Saskatchewan. Dr. McDougall is a developmental and educational psychologist who studies social relationships in childhood and adolescence as well as academic transitions including the move into postsecondary education for diverse student groups. In her role as Vice Provost, Dr. McDougall oversees a broad portfolio that includes student affairs and services alongside supports for, and innovative developments in, teaching and learning both on campus and in distributed contexts. Her work includes participating in the development and implementation of Indigenous initiatives (e.g., involving students and academic programming) in partnership with a range of stakeholders.


Jacqueline Ottmann

Jacqueline Ottmann - vice-provost of Indigenous engagement

Dr. Jacqueline Ottmann is Anishinaabe (Saulteaux), a former elementary and high school teacher and principal, and now a scholar. While at the University of Calgary, she was Coordinator of the First Nations, Métis, Inuit undergraduate teacher education program, and Director of Indigenous Education Initiatives within the Werklund School of Education (WSE). She also co-chaired the WSE Indigenous Strategy, and, alongside the Provost, the university-wide Indigenous Strategy.

As of October 1, 2017, Dr. Ottmann became Professor and Vice-Provost Indigenous Engagement at the University of Saskatchewan. She has been recognized as an international researcher, advocate, and change-maker whose purpose is to transform practices inclusive of Indigenous leadership, methodologies and pedagogies. Dr. Ottmann is driven to create schools and communities that foster a deeper sense of belonging and appreciation for Indigenous peoples - their histories, stories, ways of knowing and being.


May 2

Mary Burgess

Mary Burgess (BCcampus)

Mary Burgess is the Executive Director at BCcampus, an organization funded by the BC Ministry of Advanced Education, Skills and Training to support the Teaching and Learning, Open Education and Educational Technology needs of the B.C. post-secondary system. Mary's focus is on improving access to learning and helping educators provide flexible learning environments in which students can engage in their own learning. A long-time Open Education advocate, Mary believes that this movement is imperative to equity in our education systems and that by sharing data, research and educational resources we strengthen those systems and make learning more accessible to all.


Stryker Calvez

Stryker Calvez (University of Saskatchewan)

Dr. Stryker Calvez is a Metis/Michif researcher and educator from the Red River territory around Winnipeg. Over the last 20 years he has worked extensively with provincial governments, post-secondary institutions, organizations and communities to better understand how to implement and/or improve educational, social support, and health programming for Indigenous peoples, newcomers to Canada, and vulnerable populations. He has been recognized for his contributions to these communities, building better understandings of Indigenous people, supporting diversity and inclusion management, and facilitating effective intergroup relations. Currently he is the Manager of Indigenous Education Initiatives at the University of Saskatchewan. In this position, Stryker has been leading and supporting numerous institutional indigenization priorities, building reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, developing cultural professional development initiatives, and consulting with colleges and schools to develop and implement indigenization strategies.


Maria Campbell

Maria Campbell (University of Saskatchewan)

Maria Campbell is a writer, director, and teacher. She has published seven books with an eighth to be published in the Spring of 2018. Her work has been nationally and internationally recognized and translated into several languages. In 2003, she was inducted into the Saskatchewan Theatre Hall of Fame.

Maria’s work has won her numerous awards and honors, including the Chalmers Award, The National Aboriginal Achievement Award, The Molson Prize for the Arts, and four Honorary Doctorates. She served as Writer in Residence at several universities and public libraries across Canada, and as a Stanley Knowles Scholar at the University of Brandon. Maria recently completed a three year Trudeau Fellowship at the University of Ottawa.

Maria has worked as a volunteer with women and children in crisis for over 50 years, and on numerous social justice issues. Currently, she is the Cultural Advisor at the University of Saskatchewan with the Gwenna Moss Centre and College of Law, and the Athabasca University. But, first and foremost, she is a mom, grandmother and great grandmother.


Jacqueline Ottmann

Jacqueline Ottmann (University of Saskatchewan)

Dr. Jacqueline Ottmann is Anishinaabe (Saulteaux), a former elementary and high school teacher and principal, and now a scholar. While at the University of Calgary, she was Coordinator of the First Nations, Métis, Inuit undergraduate teacher education program, and Director of Indigenous Education Initiatives within the Werklund School of Education (WSE). She also co-chaired the WSE Indigenous Strategy, and, alongside the Provost, the university-wide Indigenous Strategy.

As of October 1, 2017, Dr. Ottmann became Professor and Vice-Provost Indigenous Engagement at the University of Saskatchewan. She has been recognized as an international researcher, advocate, and change-maker whose purpose is to transform practices inclusive of Indigenous leadership, methodologies and pedagogies. Dr. Ottmann  is driven to create schools and communities that foster a deeper sense of belonging and appreciation for Indigenous peoples - their histories, stories, ways of knowing and being.


David Porter

David Porter (eCampusOntario)

Dr. David Porter is the CEO of eCampusOntario, the primary face of the Ontario Online Learning Consortium (OOLC), a not-for-profit corporation whose membership is composed of all publicly-funded colleges and universities in Ontario.

David is a long-time advocate for the benefits of adapting new technology to deliver educational opportunities, and has been involved in open and distance learning since the 1990s, at both the K-12 and higher education levels.

David was formerly Associate VP Educational Support and Innovation at the British Columbia Institute of Technology. For 11 years, David was the Executive Director BCcampus. During his term at BCcampus, David and his team engineered Canada’s first government-funded open textbook program, a leading-edge move in higher education in 2012.

David has also worked as a project leader and consultant for international open and distance learning projects, most recently in Mongolia, Malaysia, and Vietnam. He is a co-editor of the International Journal of eLearning and Distance Education (IJEDE.ca), an open access journal.


Heather Ross

Heather M. Ross (University of Saskatchewan)

Heather M. Ross is an educational developer in the Gwenna Moss Centre for Teaching and Learning at the University of Saskatchewan, where she leads the university’s open educational resources (OER) initiative, advises on course development, and co-leads the institution’s digital information literacy initiative. She is also an OER Research Fellow with the Open Education Group. Her research interests include student and instructor views of adopting, modifying, and using OER, and the effect the use of OER has on student learning outcomes in higher education.


Kory Wilson

Kory Wilson (British Columbia Institute of Technology)

Kory Wilson, BSc. JD, is the Executive Director of Indigenous Initiatives and Partnerships for British Columbia Institute of Technology.  She is Kwakwaka’wakw. Kory is Chair of the National Indigenous Education Committee of Colleges and Institutions Canada and she has over 20 years of experience in post-secondary education, community development, and the legal profession.  She has a deep commitment to education and has dedicated her working life to ensuring that under-represented learners succeed, both within learning institutions and the larger community.  Good governance and supporting communities to move towards self-government is a passion.  Innovative and creative solutions are needed to move Reconciliation into ReconciliACTION.  Education is the key and access to knowledge is vital to move everyone forward.


Ryan Jimmy and Janice Linklater (Saskatchewan Indian Institute of Technologies)

Ryan is a Nehiyaw (plains Cree) from Onion Lake, SK. He is an instructor in the Mental Health & Wellness diploma program at the Saskatchewan Indian Institute of technologies (SIIT). He has participated in various research projects locally and nationally on Two-spirit and queer Indigenous issues, homelessness, and LGBT mental health.

Janice Linklater is Anishinabe from Couchiching First Nation in Treaty 3 area of northwestern Ontario.  She has 3 children and 4 grandchildren. She has a Master’s degree in counselling psychology.  She has lived with and conquered addictions and mental health challenges, both personally and professionally, for most of her life.  Janice loves being an educator and loves life in general.


Lori Campbell (University of Waterloo) and Jaime Cidro (University of Winnipeg)

Lori is a 2-Spirit Mētis woman: Nēhiyaw and Scottish. Her relatives are from Treaty 6 territory. She is an intergenerational survivor of the residential school system & a child from the Sixties Scoop. The thing she is most proud of is that over the last 25 years, she has located her birth mom and all 6 of her living siblings who were relocated across Canada.

Dr. Jaime Cidro is the Indigenous Academic Lead in the Office of Indigenous Affairs, and Acting Director for the Masters in Development Practice: Indigenous Development at the University of Winnipeg.


Mary Burgess (BCcampus), Maria Campbell, Rose Roberts, and Heather M. Ross (University of Saskatchewan)

Mary Burgess is the Executive Director at BCcampus, an organization funded by the BC Ministry of Advanced Education, Skills and Training to support the Teaching and Learning, Open Education and Educational Technology needs of the B.C. post-secondary system. Mary's focus is on improving access to learning and helping educators provide flexible learning environments in which students can engage in their own learning. A long-time Open Education advocate, Mary believes that this movement is imperative to equity in our education systems and that by sharing data, research and educational resources we strengthen those systems and make learning more accessible to all.

Maria Campbell is a writer, director, and teacher. She has published seven books with an eighth to be published in the spring of 2018. Her work has been nationally and internationally recognized and translated into several languages. In 2003, she was inducted into the Saskatchewan Theatre Hall of Fame. Maria’s work has won her numerous awards and honors, including the Chalmers Award, The National Aboriginal Achievement Award, The Molson Prize for the Arts, and four Honorary Doctorates. She served as Writer in Residence at several universities and public libraries across Canada, and as a Stanley Knowles Scholar at the University of Brandon. Maria recently completed a three year Trudeau Fellowship at the University of Ottawa. Maria has worked as a volunteer with women and children in crisis for over 50 years and on numerous social justice issues. Currently, she is the Cultural Advisor at the University of Saskatchewan with the Gwenna Moss Centre and College of Law, and the Athabasca University. But, first and foremost, she is a mom, grandmother and great grandmother.

Rose Roberts is Woodland Cree from the community of Stanley Mission, SK and a registered member of the Lac La Ronge Indian Band. She was raised speaking the Cree language and playing in the rocks, water and trees of the Precambrian Shield – until she was sent to residential school at the age of 6. Since that time she has been walking with a foot in both worlds and finding ways of maintaining her cultural integrity as a Nihithow iskwew. Rose has an undergraduate degree in Nursing, masters and doctoral degrees in Community Health and Epidemiology; all from the University of Saskatchewan. She has held faculty positions at the College of Nursing and School of Public Health at the University of Saskatchewan. She has been a part of the University of Saskatchewan community since 1992 and has recently joined the Indigenous Voices team at Gwenna Moss Centre for Teaching & Learning. Her role as an Educational Development Specialist is to work with faculty and staff as they progress on their personal and professional paths toward Indigenization.

Heather M. Ross is an educational developer in the Gwenna Moss Centre for Teaching and Learning at the University of Saskatchewan, where she leads the university’s open educational resources (OER) initiative, advises on course development, and co-leads the institution’s digital information literacy initiative. She is also an OER Research Fellow with the Open Education Group. Her research interests include student and instructor views of adopting, modifying, and using OER, and the effect the use of OER has on student learning outcomes in higher education.


Nancy Turner

Nancy Turner - Director, Teaching and Learning Enhancement, University of Saskatchewan

Nancy’s role as Director involves working in partnership with colleges/schools and other units to support the ongoing enhancement of learning and teaching, the development of positive student learning experiences and the provision of quality academic and professional development that enables both of these at the university. Nancy provides strategic oversight and leadership to three specialist units: The Gwenna Moss Centre for Teaching and Learning, Media Production and Student Employment and Career Centre. She also contributes to strategic developments in teaching and learning policy and practice and leads related institutional change initiatives.

Nancy’s work for the past 15 years has focused on strategic leadership of learning and teaching enhancement including initial and continuing professional development of faculty and graduate students, technology enhanced learning, reward and recognition for teaching, sustainability, student engagement in educational change, and open education. Her main areas of research are development of self belief, professional learning and change in higher education. Nancy has taught for over two decades in Canadian and UK Higher Education, in classroom, laboratory and online learning environments, and has led curriculum design and delivery in both National contexts.