The Gwenna Moss Centre for Teaching and Learning (GMCTL) Celebration Week series of sessions is organized by the GMCTL and aims to enhance and celebrate your teaching practice in a variety of ways. The series includes the Celebration of Teaching event, innovative teaching showcases, interactive workshops, and gatherings tailored to specific groups or interests.

Schedule

Monday, April 24

Just for Graduate Students: Using Improv in Teaching

Time: 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
Location: Room 182, John Mitchell Building
Facilitator: Marley Duckett
Session Type: Just for You

This workshop will examine some of the fundamental principles of improvisational theatre and how these philosophies can be paired with teaching methods and practices concerning presentation, engagement, and participation. The games played in this workshop will center on body language, movement, choral, and energy exchange and how these are useful in the classroom. Improv is a hands on discipline so please come prepared to try out some group games and discuss the material together as we go!

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Just for STEM: Student Assessment

Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Location: Room G3, Murray Library
Facilitator: Ryan Banow, Brian Zulkoskey
Session Type: Just for You

This session will be themed around assessment formats and will feature a presentation from Brian Zulkoskey from Physics. This winter term in Physics 117, the instructors have implemented Multiple Choice 2.0: Integrated Testlets (from our guest Dr. Aaron Slepkov's presentations in November) for their exams. Brian will be able to share their experiences.

In addition, there will be opportunities for you all to share what has been working well and maybe not-working so well for assessments in your courses.

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Tuesday, April 25

Just for STEM: Practical Labs

Time: 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM
Location: Room G3, Murray Building
Facilitator: Ryan Banow
Session Type: Just for You

The goal of this session is for lab facilitators and instructors from different Science disciplines to get together, meet one another, and share the structure and logistics of their practical labs.

Examples include: Are there pre-lab briefings/tutorials? How many teaching assistants are hired? What are the roles of the teaching assistants? Do the markers take the marking home? What kind of marking keys are used? How are accommodations from DSS handled? How are absences handled? Are there lab exams? Are there templates for lab reports?

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Sharing Strategies for Using Top Hat

Time: 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Location: GMCTL Classroom (Murray 50.12)
Facilitator: Ryan Banow
Session Type: Incubator

This session is for instructors that used Top Hat in the 2016-17. This is an opportunity to meet and discuss your experiences, strategies, successes, and challenges with others. You will likely leave with some new ideas of how to use Top Hat effectively.

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Wednesday, April 26

Innovative Teaching Showcase: Teaching Approaches and Open Pedagogy

Time: 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Location: Room 3, Edwards School of Business
Session Type: Incubator

This mini-conference style gathering is a showcase of the innovative work that has come from colleges, departments, and instructors who have accessed funding administered by the Gwenna Moss Centre for Teaching and Learning. This funding includes funding from the Curriculum Innovation Fund, Experiential Learning Fund, and the Open Textbook Fund. Project leads and their co-presenters will present for 10-minutes on their projects and will be available to answer your questions.

Come out to learn about their projects, support your colleagues, and leave with new campus connections and ideas for your teaching!

Some presenters and topics for this theme include:

Inspiring Interprofessional Excellence
Leah Thorp

This curricular resource was designed to provide an opportunity for faculty and students to explore interprofessional competencies in a simulation learning environment. The project was to provide the organizational, curricular, and physical spaces in which the innovative strategy of interprofessional simulation could be utilized for learning with undergraduate nursing and medical students. This resource increased knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviors related to practice.

3-D Modelling Assisted Learning
Terry Fonstad
The College of Engineering was given the opportunity to purchase computer hardware to assist students with 3-D modelling assisted learning. The equipment was installed in the College's Applied learning centre and is used extensively by design groups to design in 3-D, complete complex and computing intensive modelling. There is a large screen options to allow more experienced students to mentor others. The final step is the realization of these designs as full size prototypes in the adjacent labs.

The RRM 421 Experience
Tom Yates
RRM 421 is a group project course that seeks to teach students the realities of team project work for non-university organizations with real problems. This presentation will describe the course and a recent project for Saskatchewan Wildfire Management and the Saskatchewan Power Corporation.

Enhance the Experience by Sending Them Away!
Ross Welford

This presentation describes how a visit to a local industry trade show was incorporated into a course for undergraduate students in the College of Agriculture & Bioresources. The presentation will outline the self-guided, community-based learning opportunity and critique its effectiveness.

Communication Systems in the Animal Body
Jorge Chedrese and Daniel Shott
We will introduce students to the science of physiology by using communication in the animal body as a central connecting theme. Focus will be on how environmental signals affect electrical and fluid communication between organs. We will use an evolutionary approach to describe signaling and origin of neural structures in primitive animal species.

Images of Sport and Spectacle in Ancient Greece and Rome: An Open Access Textbook Project
Angela Kalinowski & Helanna Miazga
In this presentation we will discuss our experiences using the Islandora platform to create an open access image repository / textbook for History 115.3, Sport and Spectacle in Ancient Greece and Rome, focusing especially on the advantages of the platform and challenges that we have encountered.

A New Approach to Teaching Civil Procedure
Keir Vallance
In 2014, the College of Law embarked upon a new, project-based, pass/fail model of teaching civil procedure. This brief presentation will summarize the process of designing the new model and will present one instructor’s experience in teaching the class.

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Innovative Teaching Showcase: Indigenization

Time: 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Location: Room 3, Edwards School of Business
Session Type: Incubator

This mini-conference style gathering is a showcase of the innovative work that has come from colleges, departments, and instructors who have accessed funding administered by the Gwenna Moss Centre for Teaching and Learning. This funding includes funding from the Curriculum Innovation Fund, Experiential Learning Fund, and the Open Textbook Fund. Project leads and their co-presenters will present for 10-minutes on their projects and will be available to answer your questions.

Come out to learn about their projects, support your colleagues, and leave with new campus connections and ideas for your teaching!

Some presenters and topics for this theme include:

Developing an Indigenous STEM Program in Arts & Science
Kristina Bidwell & Sandy Bonny
We will be sharing our work-in-progress use of the Gwenna Moss Curriculum Innovation Fund to develop 90 level (non-credit) courses as part of our Indigenous STEM program.  These 90 level courses will help Indigenous students find an accelerated path toward success in STEM degree programs.

Weaving Indigenous Science: An innovative course addressing Indigenous and Western scientific knowledge systems
Jeff Baker
This presentation will share reasons for the creation of this course along with examples of course content and activities. Evidence of the impact of this course will be shared via excerpts from students’ reviews of the course.

The importance of Land-Based Education in Teaching Environmental Science and Resource Management with an Indigenous Student Cohort
Melissa Arcand
The presentation will provide a reflection on the first offering of an intensive land-based course in environmental science to students in training to become land managers in First Nations communities. I will overview the successes and challenges of offering an intensive introductory course in environmental science to and the critical role that land-based education played in achieving student learning outcomes.

Onikaniwak: For Those Who Lead: Supporting Culturally Relevant Teaching, Learning and Leading Through Indigenous Perspectives
Dawn Wallin
This study tour, supported by the Experiential Learning Fund, is situated in the boreal forest of Northern Manitoba on Opakwayak Cree Nation territory. The summer institute helps develop understanding and knowledge of Aboriginal history, worldviews and culture by engaging students in a variety of experiences that are authentic, land and experience based. The learning institute focuses on developing leadership capacity to support educational outcomes of growing numbers of First Nations, Metis and Inuit student in educational contexts.

Remote Clinical Practice: Promoting Culturally Competent Veterinary Care Through Service Learning
Jordan Woodsworth
4th year students at the WCVM are given two opportunities annually to participate in Community Engaged Service Learning in an Indigenous community in Northern Saskatchewan. Our approach to equipping our students with tools to demonstrate cultural humility and competence is multi-dimensional and continues to evolve each year.

Educational Administration Indigenous Leadership M.Ed.
Michael Cottrell
This presentation describes the development of a new Indigenous Leadership Cohort within the department of Educational Administration's course-based Masters of Education. It celebrates the support of GMTLC in the initial needs assessment, development work and community consultation leading to the first intake into the cohort.

Blending On-Site and Distance Learning Students in the Course: ENVS 825 Water Resources Management in Cold Regions
Karl-Erich Lindenschmidt
This course has been tailored to blend in both on-campus and distance-learning students. The course provides an interdisciplinary mix of social, natural and engineering science topics.

Land-based experiential learning and historical knowledge transmission: Wankuskewin Trip 2016
Allyson Stevenson
This presentation discusses the class trip to Wanuskewin by INDG 262, Aboriginal Narratives of Historical Memory in May, 2016.  The visit to Wanuskewin, supported by the Experiential Learning Fund, supported my goal of grounding Indigenous histories in histories of the land.  The course, which relied heavily on Indigenous historians and story, allowed students to think deeply about place and memory.  By firstly establishing the connection to land at Wanuskewin, we built together as a class a respectful appreciation for Indigenous histories, and a critical understanding of place. 

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Thursday, April 27

Open Pedagogy

Time: 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
Location: GMCTL Classroom (Murray 50.12)
Facilitator: Heather Ross
Session Type: Expansion Pack

Open pedagogy allows students, through the use of open educational resources, to revise, remix, develop, and share course learning materials as individuals or through collaboration. This session provides an introduction to this concept as well as an opportunity for participants to develop their own ideas of how to implement open pedagogy into their courses.

Register

Innovative Teaching Showcase: Program and Course Design

Time: 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Location: Room 3, Edwards School of Business
Session Type: Incubator

This mini-conference style gathering is a showcase of the innovative work that has come from colleges, departments, and instructors who have accessed funding administered by the Gwenna Moss Centre for Teaching and Learning. This funding includes funding from the Curriculum Innovation Fund, Experiential Learning Fund, and the Open Textbook Fund. Project leads and their co-presenters will present for 10-minutes on their projects and will be available to answer your questions.

Come out to learn about their projects, support your colleagues, and leave with new campus connections and ideas for your teaching!

Some presenters and topics for this theme include:

Mapping Community-Engaged Teaching & Learning @ Edwards School of Business
Chelsea Willness & Vincent Bruni-Bossio
This presentation will describe a two-year curriculum innovation project designed to assess the landscape and practice of community-engaged teaching and learning, and the resources, policies and procedures currently used for incorporating community engagement into the curriculum of the Edwards School of Business. The project objectives included identifying current practices, successes, and challenges and these were achieved as well as facilitating an in-depth and inclusive discussion around experiential and community-engaged teaching and learning. The funding also supported a PhD student project assistant, who gained additional knowledge and skills in interviewing, qualitative analysis, and stakeholder engagement. Our project has already been referenced to inform new initiatives and strategies in our College. In addition to the results of this project, the process itself may provide a useful and adaptable model for other colleges, schools, departments, or organizations.

Building a Program to Build Games
Kevin Stanley
Computer games are an important industry, as Canada is the third largest producer of digital games in the world, and the computer games industry is a voracious consumer of programming and artistic talent. However, the games industry is not like many other computer science disciplines as it requires a diverse set of graphical, simulation, physics and artistic skills. This talk will describe the process we went through to create a program of study which crosses two programs (BSc and BASc) to provide students with the breadth of experience required for the game industry.

INCC 201.3: Alternative Reading Week
Nancy Van Styvendale & Swapna Padmanabha
Alternative Reading Week is an immersive community service-learning experience that takes place during the February Reading Week and is attached to the interdisciplinary course, INCC 201.3: Dynamics of Community Involvement. The course instructor, TA, and possibly a former student from the class will present on the benefits and challenges of immersive service-learning in the context of relevant scholarship on similar programs elsewhere. Attention will be given to pedagogical strategies used to guide students through the experience in a way that challenges existing inequities in power/privilege.

Governance & Leadership Development Practicum: Implementing and Sustaining Community-University Partnerships
Chelsea Willness
Community-based experiential learning is a fundamental component of this course at the Edwards School of Business, as students are paired with a non-profit Board and designated mentor for 8 months, during which time they will serve as contributing (but non-voting) Board members. Students concurrently participate in an interactive seminar series on fundamentals of governance, strategy, leadership, ethics, and board composition. My presentation will highlight how the GMCTL Experiential Learning Grant enabled support for some logistics of the course as well as the inaugural Edwards Partnership Gala, which showcases students and community organizations who are involved in the Governance & Leadership Development Practicum and the Management Consulting course, and provides a platform for building awareness and strengthening relationships that contribute to the long-term sustainability of these initiatives.

An Introduction to Clinical Pathology for Second Year Veterinary Students
Marion Jackson
The presentation will involve providing the background that led to this choice of medium for teaching and a demonstration of the e-book product. A summary of student evaluations, from the Western College of Veterinary Medicine and the University of Calgary Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, may also be provided.

A Multi-pronged Approach: Developing Undergraduate and Graduate Streams in Leadership in Post-secondary Education
Vicki Squires
The Department of Educational Administration embarked on a process to introduce a new specialization, Leadership in Post-secondary Education. Working with specialists in Gwenna Moss starting in November 2015, we launched the certificate level in May 2016, the Graduate level in Sept. 2016, and currently have an enrolment of 35 (combined); now we are developing Phase II, fully online delivery of these courses.

Pilot of International Comparative Teaching in the Pharmacy Curriculum
Jason Perepelkin & Phillip Woods (Griffith University)
This presentation will provide a summary of a international comparative teaching project that was conducted at Griffith University, Australia in March 2015. The intervention and assessment will be discussed, along with lessons learned and take-aways from the project. 

Register

Friday, April 28

Innovative Teaching Showcase: Experiential Learning and Undergraduate Research

Time: 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Location: Room 3, Edwards School of Business
Session Type: Incubator

This mini-conference style gathering is a showcase of the innovative work that has come from colleges, departments, and instructors who have accessed funding administered by the Gwenna Moss Centre for Teaching and Learning. This funding includes funding from the Curriculum Innovation Fund, Experiential Learning Fund, and the Open Textbook Fund. Project leads and their co-presenters will present for 10-minutes on their projects and will be available to answer your questions.

Come out to learn about their projects, support your colleagues, and leave with new campus connections and ideas for your teaching!

Some presenters and topics for this theme include:

Using the Pecha Kuchas in Your Classes
Mark Meyers
This session will explore ways your classes might make use of a Japanese presentation format known as the Pecha Kucha (20 slides commented on for 20 seconds each). It will feature a Pecha Kucha about how I used the format in my experiential learning class on the history of human rights, but will be of interest to anyone looking for creative pedagogical techniques or fresh ideas for research assignments.

Philosophy for Children in Saskatoon
Erin DeLathouwer & Jessie Hoffart
In this presentation we will discuss the benefits of introducing children to philosophy, as well as the skills gained by undergraduate students who have gained experience in facilitating philosophical dialogue with children in the schools. We will also suggest how this experiential learning project has had a lasting impact on our community, despite running in the College of Arts and Science for only three years.

Learning by Doing: Undergraduate Research Experience
Kevin S. Spink & Joel L. Lanovaz
Kinesiology faculty have been offering research experiences to second-year undergraduates for four years where students conduct a small study and produce a professional outcome for academic credit. The principles underpinning the experience, the logistics of the course, and the outcomes to date will be presented.

The Transformational Potential of Taught Abroad
Martin Gaal
This talk will cover the Brussels’ Study Abroad program which took place in the summer of 2016. The opportunity for our students to experience first hand the transformation of Europe, from a region of profound conflict to a zone of unprecedented peace and prosperity, was in reality an opportunity for transformation of the students themselves.

Literary Research, First-Year Studies, and Group Dynamics
David Parkinson
Does experience in a first-year course in English support the idea that research has a place in undergraduate learning?
This paper will offer one instructor's reflections on the process through which groups of first-year students developed research questions, designed and carried out projects, and presented their findings.

Can First-Year Undergraduate Students Do Research?
Xulin Guo & Kara Loy
Pushing research into earlier stages of undergraduate students’ academics, even in large classes, can be very beneficial yet challenging. The pilot on GEOG120 revealed that the logistics and unknowns were sometimes perplexing but the endeavor was largely successful.

BMSC 210 Poster Day – Making the Virtual Real
Harold Bull
Reflections following introduction of live three hour poster day event as the culmination of team-based project to create virtual posters as a term assignment in an introductory microbiology course. How it was accomplished, why it worked, student’s responses, and lessons learned for further improvements.

Experiential Learning and Conference Design: Interdisciplinary / Multidisciplinary Woolf
Ann Martin
As a course run in conjunction with the 2012 International Conference on Virginia Woolf, WGST 390.3: Interdisciplinary / Multidisciplinary Woolf enabled students to create and present research posters in an professional academic setting.  The objectives and outcomes of WGST 390.3 are the topic of this talk, especially as they pertain to the possibilities of the self-reflexive integration of cross-disciplinary, experiential, and iterative assignment design.

Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Art Practice: ANTHROPODS, Imagining the Other Side
Susan Shantz, Elizabeth Babyn, & Will Lee
We will present visual documentation of the artwork created for the international collaborative course, ART356.3 Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Art Practice: ANTHROPODS, Imagining the Other Side (Spring 2015). Senior art students at the U of S responded to artwork by their peers at the University of Southern Queensland with resulting professional exhibitions of their work in Saskatoon, Swift Current and Queensland, Australia. A student-generated blog and exhibition publication documented the learning process and as well as the final artworks.

Re-Imagining Undergraduate Environmental Programming at the U of S – Priorities and Progress
Toddi Steelman & Andrea Eccleston
The U of S offers an array of distinct undergraduate environmental degree programs from across multiple colleges and schools. Challenges can arise for prospective or current students in learning about all the options and finding the one that best suits their interests. This project seeks to address student barriers and increase student cohort building by developing a new type of integration – one that is intercollegiate and works across schools and programs. Join us to hear about the priorities and progress of this initiative.

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Celebration of Teaching

Time: 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Location: Arts 241

All instructors, and their guests, including students, are welcome to attend the announcement of the Provost's College and Themed Teaching Awards recognizing excellence in teaching. Light refreshments will be served.

Registration is not required for attendance, but it will be available.

This celebration is part of GMCTL Celebration Week - a series of events to share your innovative teaching concepts, organized by the Gwenna Moss Centre for Teaching and Learning.

Register

Session Types

Short & Snappy

Short & Snappy sessions are a speedy way to get introductory information on a new-to-you topic. Think "info-mercial" - fast and to the point. There is not a lot of time for discussion or questions, BUT you can stop at Starbucks, grab a beverage, pop over to the GMCTE classroom, and leave 30 minutes later with a new idea and information about how to learn more when you want to!

Intro & Go

This session-type is an introduction to a teaching technique, tool or strategy - just enough information to get you started - and then GO! This is basically a "Short & Snappy" session WITH time for discussion questions, sharing ideas and reactions, and to explore a little bit more. Think of it as a mini-presentation like you might experience at a conference followed by a coffee chat.  These sessions are typically 80-90 minutes.

Expansion Pack

Expansion Pack sessions offer further application and strategies of a specific concept or challenge with focused time for more in-depth work.  This is more of a traditional workshop format: activities combined with new information and time to apply the principles and receive feedback. Expansion Pack lengths vary, but are typically around 2 hours.

Incubator

The purpose of this type of session is to bring together colleagues with shared goals and interest in an emerging topic. The time is used to work, connect, brainstorm, explore, develop, and share to move projects forward, while connecting with colleagues. There won't be any presentations or workshop-type activities - this is colleagues working together. The length of incubators varies depending on the needs of the group.

Just for You

Co-created with specific groups, Just for You sessions focus on topics, examples and approaches specific to a discipline or role, with the format determined by the goals of the group. These sessions are tailored to your needs. Interestingly, these sessions can use any of the format structures; their uniqueness is the group.  As you might imagine, length and format depend on the desired outcomes of the groups.